Community Alert: 1/17/2020
Posted: Friday, January 17th, 2020, 7:21 pm PST

This Timely Warning message is being sent to you in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Act.

Type of Incident: Warning about consuming prescription medications that have not been prescribed to you and consuming substances manufactured to mimic prescription medications.

The Department of Public Safety wants to remind community members to consume medications that have been prescribed to you in accordance with your doctor’s instructions. Further, do not take any prescription medication that has been not been prescribed to you. Additionally, do not consume substances intended to mimic legitimate prescription medications and avoid consuming substances that have been manufactured by an unregulated entity.

The U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration has been investigating reports of illegally manufactured pills containing fentanyl that have been smuggled into the U.S. from Mexico. Specifically, blue pills, round in shape, stamped with the letter “M” and the number “30” have been located in the U.S. Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid that is similar to morphine only it is 50-100 times more potent and can be highly toxic even in small doses. The DEA issued a public warning about counterfeit prescription pills, which can be found here: https://www.dea.gov/press-releases/2019/11/07/dea-issues-warning-over-counterfeit-prescription-pills-mexico

For more information about fentanyl, including signs and symptoms of an overdose and what to do if you suspect someone has been exposed to fentanyl or has consumed fentanyl, see the links below. Immediate action needs to be taken if someone is experiencing a fentanyl overdose. If you suspect the presence of fentanyl, call 911. Do not intentionally touch or inhale the substance and move away from the area. If you possess pills that have not been prescribed to you and have a concern that they might contain fentanyl, do NOT handle the pills directly and notify local law enforcement immediately. Do not throw them away as someone else might find them. It is critical to be forthcoming and explicit with law enforcement and medical care providers about the potential presence of fentanyl so that they can respond appropriately.

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/drugfacts/fentanyl

https://www.cdph.ca.gov/Documents/FentOverdose4FirstResponders_09.09.19.pdf

https://www.hhs.gov/opioids/

The following link provides information about the disposal of prescription medication and drop off locations: https://apps2.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/pubdispsearch/spring/main?execution=e1s2